Barber's Best

A virtual tour of the classic motorcycle collection on display at the Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum in Leeds, Ala.


4/9/2014

1969 Vostok C364

Country: U.S.S.R. (Russia)
Engine: Air-cooled, in-line 4-cylinder 4-stroke
Ignition: Magneto
Power Rating: 56hp @ 13,00rpm
Bore x Stroke: 49mm x 46mm
Displacement: 347cc
Valves: Gear driven twin cam. One inlet, two exhaust valves per cylinder
Fuel System: Four Dell’Orto carburetors
Transmission: 6-speed
Suspension: Front Italian Ceriani telescopic forks, rear twin shock
Brakes: Front Italian four shoe drum, Jawa rear drum
Weight: 344lb
Top Speed: Unknown

1969 Vostok C364

Built by Moscow based Central Construction and Experimental Bureau with help from Motokov (Jawa) in Czechoslovakia, the Vostok 350 and 500 fours raced outside of Russia infrequently, always in Communist controlled countries. Loosely based on the Honda/MV/Gilera designs, these crudely built and unreliable machines disappeared in 1969, outclassed by European and Japanese machinery. These machines were the most technically advanced racing motorcycles that Russia ever produced.

1969 Vostok C364



3/26/2014

1954 BSA B34

Country: Great Britain
Engine: Air-cooled single-cylinder 4-stroke
Ignition: Lucas magneto with manual spark control
Power Rating: 28hp @ 5,500rpm
Bore x Stroke: 85mm x 88mm
Displacement: 499cc
Valves: Overhead, pushrod activated
Fuel System: Single Amal Monobloc carburetor
Transmission: 4-speed
Suspension: Front telescopic forks, rear twin shock
Brakes: Front and rear drum
Weight: 320lb
Top Speed: 70mph

1954 BSA B34

Sold in the U.S. for trail or enduro use, the Alloy Clipper is often mistaken for a Gold Star, but is an export version of the B34 observed trials machine. The alloy cylinder and cylinder head are of the small fin style from the earlier ZB model, used to reduce weight. The modest power that this motor produces doesn’t require a lot of cooling fins.

1954 BSA B34



3/12/2014

1971 Triumph Trident Production Racer

Country: Great Britain
Engine: Air-cooled, 3-cylinder 4-stroke
Ignition: Battery and Coil
Power Rating: 74hp @ 8,500rpm
Bore x Stroke: 67mm x 70mm
Displacement: 740cc
Valves: Overheard, pushrod activated
Fuel System: Three Amal 27mm concentric carburetors
Transmission: Quaife close ratio 5-speed
Suspension: Front telescopic fork, twin shock rear
Brakes: Front and rear disc
Weight: 410lb
Top Speed: 145mph

1971 Triumph Trident Production Racer

In an effort to boost sales of their street machines, Triumph built special versions to compete in the popular production racing class. While looking close to stock on the outside these bikes were prepared in the factory race shop to a very high state of tune. The three-cylinder machines were very successful, with a sister machine to this one winning the Isle of Man production TT no less than five times.

1971 Triumph Trident Production Racer



2/26/2014
Gilera B 300 Twin

Country: Italy
Engine: Air-cooled vertical twin 4-stroke
Ignition: Battery and coil
Power Rating: 12.5bhp @ 5,800rpm
Bore x Stroke: 60mm x 54mm
Displacement: 305cc
Valves: Overhead, pushrod activated
Fuel System: Single Dell’Orto 20mm carburetor
Transmission: 4-speed
Suspension: Front telescopic forks, rear twin shock
Brake: Front and rear drum
Weight: Approx. 380lb
Top Speed: 70mph

Gilera B 300 Twin

Sensation of the 1953 Milan show, the 300 twin was virtually a doubled-up version of the well-developed 150cc single. Although lacking in power, the B 300 was exceptionally smooth, easy to start and very flexible. This was a luxury tourer from a company that mainly produced inexpensive lightweights that sold in the U.S. under the Sears & Roebuck label.

Gilera B 300 Twin



2/13/2014
1979 Ducati 900 SS

Country: Italy
Engine: Air-cooled, 90-degree V-twin, 4-stroke
Ignition: Battery and coil
Power Rating: 72bhp @ 7,00rpm
Bore x Stroke: 86mm x 74mm
Displacement: 864cc
Valves: SOHC, shaft and bevel driven
Fuel System: Two Dell’Orto 40mm carburetors
Transmission: 5-speed
Suspension: Front telescopic forks, rear twin shock
Brakes: Front twin disc, rear single disc
Weight: 428lb
Top Speed: 135mph

1979 Ducati 900 SS

The 900SS is a bored out version of the 750, still retaining Ducati’s unique desmodromic valve actuation, using opening and closing rockers, eliminating the need for valve springs. A modified version won the 1977 Daytona Superbike race ridden by “Cycle” magazine editor Cook Neilson. Ducati listed a race kit that included a full fairing, oil radiator, special cams and exhaust system. This bike has been restored by the museum staff back to its original specification and colors.

1979 Ducati 900 SS



1/30/2014

1953 Honda Cub

Country: Japan
Engine: Air-cooled, single-cylinder 2-stroke
Ignition: Flywheel magneto
Power rating: 1.8hp
Bore x stroke: 43mm x 40mm
Displacement: 58cc
Fuel system: Carburetor
Transmission: Single-speed
Suspension: Front spring, rigid rear
Brakes: Rear drum
Weight: 131lb
Top speed: 25mph

1953 Honda Cub

This “clip-on” cycle motor had great historical significance, being one of the first motorized products from the Honda Motor Co. In the aftermath of WW2, there was a desperate need to mobilize the population, and simple economical power units that could easily be attached to bicycles became immensely popular. The period bicycle has many interesting details, and was manufactured by the Kumotsru Cycle Co.

1953 Honda Cub



1/15/2014

1997 Morbidelli V8

Country: Italy
Engine: Liquid-cooled V8 4-stroke
Ignition: Capacitor discharge ignition
Power Rating: 120hp @ 11,000rpm
Bore x Stroke: 55mm x 44.6mm
Displacement: 847cc
Valves: 32-valve, twin overhead cams
Fuel System: Fuel injection
Transmission: 5-speed, shaft final drive
Suspension: Front telescopic forks, rear single shock
Brakes: Front & rear Brembo discs
Weight: Approx. 550lb
Top Speed: 150mph

1997 Morbidelli V8

Giancarlo Morbidelli had considerable success building and racing motorcycles of his own design, including winning a 125cc world championship, defeating the factory entries. His dream was to build a Superbike — a V8. This bike is one of the four prototypes which Morbidelli hoped would be mass-produced, but lack of consumer interest, centered mainly on the controversial styling killed the project.

1997 Morbidelli V8



MY COMMUNITY
no image
RidingDogg
4/16/2014 7:37:29 PM
no image
jhutbeer
4/14/2014 9:35:30 PM
no image
900cc
4/12/2014 1:45:10 PM
no image
KEITHF
4/11/2014 4:29:22 PM
no image
900cc
4/10/2014 10:08:16 PM
no image
GTRider9
4/10/2014 8:35:40 PM
no image
KEITHF
4/10/2014 12:35:33 PM
no image
900cc
4/9/2014 7:12:15 PM


The sound and the fury: celebrate the machines that changed the world!
First Name: *
Last Name: *
Address: *
City: *
State/Province: *
Zip/Postal Code:*
Country:
Email:*
(* indicates a required item)
Canadian subs: 1 year, (includes postage & GST). Foreign subs: 1 year, . U.S. funds.
Canadian Subscribers - Click Here
Non US and Canadian Subscribers - Click Here
 

Motorcycle Classics is America's premier magazine for collectors and enthusiasts, dreamers and restorers, newcomers and life long motorheads who love the sound and the beauty of classic bikes. Every issue  delivers exciting and evocative articles and photographs of the most brilliant, unusual and popular motorcycles ever made!

Save Even More Money with our RALLY-RATE plan!

Pay now with a credit card and take advantage of our RALLY-RATE automatic renewal savings plan. You save an additional $4.95 and get 6 issues of Motorcycle Classics for only $24.95 (USA only).

Or, Bill Me Later and I'll pay just $29.95 for a one year subscription!