12 Gifts for Motorcyclists

Find the perfect holiday gift for the motorcyclist in your life.

Langlitz leather jacket

Custom-made leather riding jacket from Langlitz Leathers; starting at $1,000.

Photo courtesy Langlitz Leathers

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1. If you have someone really special on your list, here’s the gift they’ll never forget: a custom-made leather riding jacket from Langlitz Leathers. Hand-crafted at the Langlitz shop in Portland, Oregon, using only American hides and hardware, this is gear that just oozes quality. The model shown here is the Cascade. There are no logos on the jacket, just a discreet label on the inside. You can take a set of measurements at home, or visit Langlitz for fitting. Check out contributor Corey Levenson’s review of the experience. Price: starting at $1,000.

2. Perfect for your office or garage, check out the 2015 Triumph Calendar from Baxter Cycle. This year’s calendar is chock full of old Bonnevilles, new Bonnevilles, Daytonas of all ages, a Trident and even a 1937 350cc T-80 Tiger. All the photos were taken by well-known photographer Timothy Remus at locations across the U.S., and they’re gathered here to keep you thinking about Triumphs all year long. Price: $25.

3. This year’s Custom Motorcycle Calendar from Bike EXIF features all kinds of custom builds, from a tastefully modified airhead BMW to a Honda CB250 café racer, a sleek custom Moto Guzzi V50 Monza done by the folks at Revival Cycles, and even a 1972 Laverda 750 SF1 built by the Wrenchmonkees. Price: $15.99 plus shipping.

4. The AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame is busy putting the finishing touches on a classic of the great American highway: a 1965 Harley-Davidson FLH Electra Glide. The bike will be raffled to raise money for the museum, with the winner announced at AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days in July at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course in Lexington, Ohio. Raffle tickets are available by calling (800) 342-5464 or by going to the museum's raffle page. Price: $5 for one ticket, $20 for 5 tickets.

5. Got a friend who loves Ducatis? Your holiday shopping just got easier this year by getting them a copy of The Art of Ducati by Ian Falloon. Gorgeously illustrated, this carefully curated review of more than six decades of Ducati excitement features 26 bikes, from the 175 Sport single to the 750 Imola racer to modern bikes like the all-new Monster. 240 pages. Price: $60.

6. From AJSs to Vincents with plenty of Nortons and Triumphs in between, British Custom Motorcycles takes a look at some of the most fantastic and unusual British-motorcycle-based custom builds out there, marque by marque. Price: $39.95.

7. The suspension is one of the most critical aspects of any motorcycle, but it may also be the most misunderstood aspect of motorcycle performance. Most of us appreciate what it does, but we don’t really understand how it works or how to make it work better. Race Tech’s Motorcycle Suspension Bible makes the art and science of suspension tuning accessible to professional and backyard motorcycle mechanics alike by giving a firm understanding of the forces at work. A step-by-step guide, it shows and explains how you can make your bike handle like a pro’s. Price: $34.99.

8. If there’s one simple thing every rider can do to improve the performance of their motorcycle, it’s this: check your tire pressures regularly. Correct tire pressures will make your bike handle better and safer, and getting in the habit of checking them regularly might just save your hide that day when you find a tire is down 15 pounds from where it should be. A handy, easy-to-use gauge like this Motion Pro Digital Tire Pressure Gauge makes this even easier. Made from billet aluminum and featuring an 18-inch long high-pressure hose with dual swivels, the gauge uses a large, easy to read digital display with a back light and is made to last. Price: $109.99.

9. Every motorcyclist needs a good, basic tank bag. We love magnetic bags for their simplicity, but keep in mind that they only work on metal fuel tanks. This Onyx Magnetic Tank Bag from Firstgear is a great everyday bag, as it’s a medium-sized bag, measuring 13 inches long by 9 inches wide, and 5.75 inches tall for a capacity of almost 12 liters. The bottom features heavy-duty magnets inside a nonslip rubberized pad, while the top features a clear map pocket. A rain cover is included. Price: $59.95.

10. Electric gear can make the difference between an enjoyable ride and a merely bearable ride when the temperatures head south. These gloves from Joe Rocket give you the option of electric heat without the hassle of adding wiring to your bike. The Burner Heated Gloves feature a waterproof, windproof, breathable HiPora liner, plus a three-stage heat setting with up to 4 hours of capacity from the rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. They also come with a multi-port charging system that allows for simultaneous charging, and they are touchscreen-friendly. Price: $159.99.

11. “Motorcycles OK? Well of course motorcycles are OK. Who would think otherwise?” says the Noble We. Despite our incredulity, we love the idea of wearing “MOTORCYCLES OK” on a shirt, and so do the fine folks at Aerostich. An exact copy of the signs above the High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lanes across the freeways of California, these signs are a reminder that motorcycles are given extra privileges because riding them is a social good. Spread the word. Also available on coffee mugs and stickers. Price: $20 (shirt), $6 (mug), $2 (sticker).

12. A lot of old bikes are pretty limited when it comes to room for tools and spares. While a tank bag or a backpack is our favorite solution for carrying lunch and whatever else the day requires, adding a small tool bag to your bike gives you a spot for a tool roll, an extra set of plugs and maybe even an inner tube or a patch kit. Strap this Heavy Duty Distressed Brown Tool Bag from Fox Creek Leather to the back seat of your Norton, Triumph or other old steed and be prepared the next time something goes wrong. The bag measures 11 inches wide by 5.5 inches tall. Price: $68. MC