Nine Motorcycle Maintenance Tools

Gear Driven: Nine goodies to get your classic motorcycle on the road again

Motion Pro’s Cable Lube and Luber

Motion Pro’s Cable Lube and Luber

Content Tools

Price and availability confirmed at time of publication. Subject to change, please visit the product website for the latest prices and availability.   

Regular motorcycle maintenance is key to keeping your favorite classic motorcycle on the road and out of the garage. Here are some tools and products to help you maintain your motorcycle:

1. Motion Pro’s Cable Lube and Luber are easy to use and work together to make clutch, brake, throttle and other cables last longer.

2. Tight motorcycle spokes are better than loose ones, just like ... never mind. Easier to use than your old pliers, these Motion Pro chrome vanadium wrenches have offset slotted ends that make them easy and quick to use, and they’re available in three sizes (6mm/6.3mm, 6.5mm/6.8mm, and 5mm/7mm).

3. The best parts look great and work better. The Clearview Fuel Filter from Mr. Gasket features a replaceable element in a sweet chrome housing, making it easy to monitor. It fits 1/4in, 5/16in, and 3/8in fuel lines

4. Is your motorcycle idling funny after sitting all winter? Try Red Line Oil’s Complete Fuel System Cleaner. Its concentrated, high-temperature detergents clean fuel injectors, carburetors, intake valves and combustion chambers. One bottle treats up to 100 gallons.

5. Rather than replacing a motorcycle helmet visor or motorcycle windshield, try polishing those scratches out. Novus No. 1 cleans all plastics without scratching. Novus No. 2 removes fine scratches, haziness and abrasions, while Novus No. 3 removes heavy scratches from most acrylic surfaces.

6. If the inside of your gas tank has gotten rusty, we’ve got the solution. Perfect for restoring all metal gas tanks, Kreem’s Combo Kit includes a concentrated cleaner and final rinse that remove loose rust and dirt inside the tank and condition the inside surface for tank sealer. The Fuel Tank Liner then cures to provide a tank within a tank.

7. If your brain bucket has gotten a bit funky, we suggest Bike Brite’s Helmet Liner Refreshner. It cleans, freshens, and deodorizes all foam motorcycle helmet liners. Just spray it in and wipe it dry.

8. Does your classic motorcycle take an expensive stock air filter? Or is the bike you ride regularly in need of a new air filter? Uni Filter offers direct factory-replacement air filters designed to fit stock air box. They provide maximum airflow and engine protection, can easily be cleaned and re-oiled, and last for years, unlike paper air filters.

9. Perfect for bleeding the brakes on a motorcycle after it’s been sitting all winter, the Mityvac Brake Bleeding Kit includes a hand vacuum/pressure pump and all the accessories necessary to perform one-person brake bleeding. On the Fun-o-Rama scale, bleeding brakes is right up there with cleaning the toilet. And while the Mityvak doesn't exactly make brake-bleeding fun, it sure makes it easier, ensuring a hassle-free bleed with no threat of pressurized brake fluid spurting all over that perfect paint job you just finished.  With four bleed screws (dual front calipers, single rear caliper and hydraulic clutch), my new-to-me ‘83 Laverda RGS was the perfect test mule for the Mityvak. The kit consists of a vacuum/pressure pump, a sealed receptacle to catch old fluid, clear plastic hose, and a variety of adapters for different sized bleed nipples.  Bleeding is simply a matter of finding the right adapter (or in my case just slipping the plastic hose over the bleeder), pumping up the Mityvac, and then opening the bleeder screw. The first few rounds yield the nasty old fluid that's in your bike’s system, and as soon as clear, clean fluid is moving through, you're done. The system works exactly as advertised, although I found it took 10 pumps on the Mityvac to get fluid moving (the manual says it only takes “several” pumps). What I really like is that the Mityvac lets you suck all the old fluid out of your master cylinder reservoirs before you start, minimizing the mix of old and new fluid and leaving the reservoirs with clean fluid, and you're ready to ride. - Richard Backus