Add to My MSN

Found on eBay: 1985 Honda Sabre VF700S

3/17/2010 12:58:44 PM

Tags:

sabre 

Call it a near-classic or a soon-to-be classic. Or just call it a really nice Eighties bike. Either way, this Honda Sabre is in outstanding condition, would make a great rider (or even a show bike maybe?) and we're betting it sells for a fairly reasonable price.

The current owner seems to have quite a collection of older Honda's, and admits he's selling off a bit of the collection. Aside from a small chip at the rear of the tank, this one appears to be in very, very good condition. The odometer reads just 1,930 miles, and the bike appears to be all-original, though it may have newer tires, which would actually be preferable for anything other than static display.

To visit the auction for this Honda Sablre VF700S, go here. 

To see our story on the Honda Sabre VF700S, go here. 

 

 



Related Content

Charlie’s Honda Regulator/Rectifiers

New stuff for classic bikes: regulator/rectifier assemblies for early Hondas

The Honda CB450 Black Bomber

Two cylinders, twin cams and loaded with technology, the Honda CB450 put the world on notice: Honda ...

CDI Units for Honda 1982 Sabre

Motorcycle Classics’ tech expert Keith Fellenstein helps find replacement CDI units for a 1982 Hond...

Honda Electronic Ignition Kits

New stuff for old bikes: Electronic ignitions for vintage Honda twins and fours from Charlie’s Place...

Content Tools




Post a comment below.

 

Brewski
3/21/2010 8:44:39 PM
The Sabres get no respect: they didn't sell as well as their other V-4 brethren, the Interceptors (sport) or Magnas (cruiser) models, so there's fewer of them around [ie, more likely to become classics.] Of course, we're currently reliving the downside of 80s bikes: the Transformers/cartoonish "edge design" styling that was part of what killed bike sales in the 80s and led to such smoking deals on these bikes that they were considered "throw aways" by their 1st owners back then. Sabre weak points are: handling, due to seizure of the swingarm [i]bushings[/i] - if you have one that you want to resurrect, take off the swingarm, & while you have it off, drill & tap it for zerk fittings so you can lube the replacement bushings (at which point, there is no need to upgrade to bearings! "For want of a nail, the kingdom was lost..." ;)) The forks are too spindly too, for such a heavy beast, but they're about standard for the time, so what can you do? Definitely swap in tapered headstock bearings, which will help the handling considerably, & find a good fork brace for it. Watch out for pitting of the cams; some of the early bikes had improper hardening of the cam faces, and oiling was less than ideal before Honda did some revisions [likely, a larger capacity oil pump], so use a modern synthetic to keep the engine healthy & happy. Great bikes, really, but kind of rare to find in such good shape, for the reasons mentioned.



The sound and the fury: celebrate the machines that changed the world!
First Name: *
Last Name: *
Address: *
City: *
State/Province: *
Zip/Postal Code:*
Country:
Email:*
(* indicates a required item)
Canadian subs: 1 year, (includes postage & GST). Foreign subs: 1 year, . U.S. funds.
Canadian Subscribers - Click Here
Non US and Canadian Subscribers - Click Here
 

Motorcycle Classics is America's premier magazine for collectors and enthusiasts, dreamers and restorers, newcomers and life long motorheads who love the sound and the beauty of classic bikes. Every issue  delivers exciting and evocative articles and photographs of the most brilliant, unusual and popular motorcycles ever made!

Save Even More Money with our RALLY-RATE plan!

Pay now with a credit card and take advantage of our RALLY-RATE automatic renewal savings plan. You save an additional $4.95 and get 6 issues of Motorcycle Classics for only $24.95 (USA only).

Or, Bill Me Later and I'll pay just $29.95 for a one year subscription!