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HOW TO RESTORE HONDA CX500 & CX650

When Honda released the CX500, the sales brochure stated “First into the Future,” and described the bike as a road sports V-twin. Honda’s first venture into the V-twin engine market, with water cooling and shaft drive, was certainly different from their previous twin- and four-cylinder models. Known for its good handling and fuel economy, the low-maintenance Honda was comfortable, loved by tourers and couriers alike and, after overcoming early teething troubles, developed a reputation for reliability. Sportier models incorporating turbochargers were also released for those looking for an additional adrenaline rush. After 30 years, there’s now a resurgence of interest in the CX models, both from restorers and custom builders, with aftermarket café racer kits available, too.

The techniques, tips and tricks used by an experienced restorer will save you time and money. You’ll see that you don’t need expert knowledge or a fully fitted workshop for a restoration project. Packed with photographs and detailed instructions, this book is your perfect guide from start to finish.

$59.95

SUPERBIKES AND THE 70s

When rumors reached Honda that BSA/Triumph were developing a 750cc triple, it galvanized the Japanese giant into creating the world-beating CB750 Four. The British triples may have reached the market first, but the launch just a few months later of Honda's four-cylinder "Dream Four" (with electric-start, disc brakes and Candy-painted bodywork) caused a sensation in 1968. A new word now joined the lexicon: Superbikes. The opening salvos in a horsepower war had begun!

Superbikes and the '70s by Dave Sheehan captures the spirit of those heady days. It tells the story of a Britain emerging from the dull, gray years of postwar austerity into the colorful, gritty and psychedelic reality of the '70s. Despite a backcloth of dubious fashion, rampant inflation, oil embargoes and wildcat strikes, these lightning-fast, chromium-plated polychromatic motorcycles suddenly became affordable in an age of full employment. For motorcyclists the '70s meant reliable, beautifully designed machines delivering record-shattering performance!

Superbikes and the '70s brings this all home. However, it isn't just about the bikes. It's about their times, too, as reflected in its popular culture, politics, and the people key to the story of superbikes - the engineers and designers, the larger-than-life racers (such as Dick Mann, Gary Nixon, Barry Sheene and Paul Smart), the dealers and salesmen, and the industry's titans: Edward Turner and Soichiro Honda. It gets behind-the-scenes to give the full story of bikes like the Triumph and BSA triples (including the Vetter-designed Hurricane), the Honda CB750, the awesome Gold Wing and the outrageous six-cylinder Honda CBX1000 and Kawasaki Z1300 megabikes. There is also the seriously mad Kawasaki Mach III and Mach IV two-stroke triples, Ducati's remarkable Daytona-winning 750 twin, Laverda's hairy-chested Jota - and, of course, Milwaukee's XLCH Sportster, the seed of the Harley come-back.

Well-illustrated and packed with anecdotes, Superbikes and the '70s offers a wealth of thoroughly-researched detail. Sheehan presents the story from the perspective of those involved at the time, the outcomes of whose decisions were by no means certain, with the result that the narrative reads like a thriller. A recurring thread throughout the book is Cycle magazine's seminal "Superbike 7" comparison tests in 1970 and 1973, which demonstrated that superbikes were changing: Riders no longer had to sacrifice civility, comfort and reliability in the pursuit of handling, speed and acceleration.

Superbikes and the '70s is their story.

$28.99

FALCONE PRINT

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Not just a strange-looking engine – it was Moto Guzzi's primary engine type for more than 30 years. #61 in the series.


This 16" x 20" print-on-demand metallic print was created by professional motorsports photographer Daniel Peirce. Each print is signed and numbered by the author.


What is a Metallic Print? An Endura Metallic print is a unique imaging paper from Eastman Kodak. Photographically printed, the subtle metallic surface produces a depth and color richness unmatched by any other process. A subtle 3D effect is discernible in many of the images. Giclee printing is swell, but for engine pictures, Metallic is the only way to go. Also, print longevity is an impressive 100 years. Metallic prints will not disappoint. Please allow up to 5 business days to ship.

$69.00