Project 1970 Honda CB350 — Part VII

We're almost there: Just a few more parts and our 1970 Honda CB350 will be ready to roll.


| September/October 2016



Project Honda

Almost there: Throw on some bodywork and add control cables and our CB350 will be ready to roll.

Photo by Richard Backus

This is the seventh in a series on our 1970 Honda CB350 build project. Read Part I, Part II, Part III, Part IV, Part V and Part VI for earlier stages of the project, and Part VIII for the final installment. You can also watch video of our Honda running for the first time.

It may not look like it, but believe it or not, our project 1970 Honda CB350 is heading into the home stretch.

Even though our Honda is missing some critical bits — finished bodywork being at the top of the list — it’s actually very close to being finished. Sticking with our unintentional MO with this project — namely, why don’t we ever have time to get more done? — we’ve accomplished less than we wanted in the intervening time since our last update, yet we’ve moved tantalizingly close to the finish line and the first start of our little 350.

As anyone who’s restored or refurbished a bike will tell you, it’s the little things that take the most amount of time. That and forgetting to commit memory to notes so you’ll have all the pieces you need ready at hand when you actually find the time to get some work done. Blame the latter on it taking me literally weeks to finally contact Honda specialists David Silver Spares for a pair of much-needed factory replacement OEM air filters and carburetor intake mounts, along with a new rear gas tank mounting rubber. The original carb mounts were probably usable, but given the relatively modest cost of OEM replacements from David Silver Spares ($34 each) we elected to go new.

That meant we could finally mount our rebuilt carburetors, although we haven’t hooked up the new Barnett throttle cables owing to forgetting to source new bars. The originals were bent, as were the two more we scrounged up locally, pushing us to order a set of low-rise replacements, complete with dimples and wiring openings, from EMGO. Once those are in we’ll mount the controls and cables.

We finally found mufflers we like, once again turning to EMGO for a set of their Widemouth Universal Megaphone Mufflers. As the pics show, they’re not that “widemouth” and are actually reasonably close to stock looking. At just over 23 inches long they’re a little shorter than the originals, but they terminate past the rear brake drum (a look we wanted) and bolted up to our re-chromed header pipes they look great. At around $60 they seem like a good buy: We’ll let you know how they sound.





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