MORE CLASSIC MOTORCYCLES


Motorcycle Poll: Which classic single-cylinder thumper would you buy?

by Richard Backus

Oh for the days of the classic thumper. Time was when all the great British marques had something to offer the fledgling racer. Velocette never built anything but singles, with many people pointing to the 500cc Venom Clubman as the best of the breed. Norton of course had the immortal Manx, built in 350cc and 500cc versions and one of the winningest motorcycles ever made. And who can forget BSA’s incredible Gold Star, also in 350cc and 500cc guises. So the question is, if you could buy just one, which would it be?


Motorcycle Art: The Bike EXIF Motorcycle Calendar

by Landon Hall

For those of you that haven't yet heard of  Bike EXIF, it's a slick website that features a variety of unusual motorcycles, both classic and modern. The latest offering from the site is the Bike EXIF Motorcycle Calendar, and it's full of bikes from professional builders like Falcon Motorcycles, Deus Ex Machina, and the Wrenchmonkees, along with bikes you've seen in the pages of Motorcycle Classics, including two lovely custom cafés.    


Motorcycle Poll: Which classic V-twin would you buy?

by Richard Backus

  Ahh, the classic V-twin; simple, strong, it’s a template for the ages. For many people, Harley-Davidson’s Sportster defines the classic V-twin motorcycle, and has come to be the essence of motorcycling for many riders, and none more so than the classic Sportsters of the 1960s. Other makers have used the V-twin, and very successfully, too. Moto Guzzi entered the V-twin arena with the 704cc V7 in 1966, and likewise Ducati with the 748cc GT750 in 1971 (although often referred to as an “L” twin). So the question is, if you could buy just one, which would it be?


Motorcycle Poll: Which British Twin Would You Buy?

by Richard Backus

  When Triumph introduced the Bonneville 650 back in 1959, it set a new standard for a sporting British Twin and for the next 12 years was the symbol of British motorcycle might. BSA followed suit in 1962 when it introduced the unit construction A65 650 Star twin, the forerunner of BSA’s go-faster Rocket, Lightning, Hornet and others. Not to be outdone, Norton introduced the 750 Atlas the same year, hoping to trump its rivals in cubic capacity. The Atlas ultimately led to the iconic Commando of 1969-1975. All three spawned a generation of great British sport bikes. So the question is, if you could buy just one, which would it be?


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Motorcycle Poll: Which 750 Four would you buy?

by Richard Backus

  When Honda launched the immortal CB750 Four back in 1969, it was so far ahead of the curve it took the rest of Japan’s Big Four years to catch up. First up was Suzuki with the GS750 in 1977, followed by Kawasaki with the KZ750 in 1980. Yamaha took even longer to join the party, announcing its first inline 750 four, the Seca, in 1981, 12 years after Honda’s CB750 came out. So the question is, if you were buying one today, which would it be? Click the link and vote now! 


Join the Motorcycle Classics Editorial Advisory Group

by Richard Backus

  Did you know you can help us decide what goes into each issue of Motorcycle Classics? You can, simply by joining our Editorial Advisory Group. If you’re not already a member of our advisory group, you probably didn’t realize that we survey every issue of Motorcycle Classics. In addition to giving their opinions on specific motorcycles and story ideas, advisory group members also choose the cover of every issue of Motorcycle Classics, helping us craft the classic motorcycle magazine you want to read.


Motorcycle Poll: Which 500cc twin would you buy?

by Landon Hall

Remember the mid-1970s, when twins were still hot and a 500cc bike was big enough for the road? Three of our favorites were Honda’s CB500T, Suzuki’s 500 Titan and Yamaha’s XS500. Cool bikes then, we think they’re even cooler today. So if you were going to buy one today, which would it be? Click the link and vote now!


Motorcycle Poll: Which triple would you buy?

by Landon Hall

  Way back in our very first issue we examined Yamaha’s 1976 XS750 triple. For comparison, we looked at other three-cylinder motorcycles including a 1976 Laverda 3C and a 1976 Suzuki GT750. While they’re all good bikes in their own way, they don’t all share the same appeal. So our question is, if you were going to buy one of these today, which would it be? Vote now, and feel free to leave a comment in the “comments” section.  



The sound and the fury: celebrate the machines that changed the world!

Motorcycle Classics JulAug 16Motorcycle Classics is America's premier magazine for collectors and enthusiasts, dreamers and restorers, newcomers and life long motorheads who love the sound and the beauty of classic bikes. Every issue  delivers exciting and evocative articles and photographs of the most brilliant, unusual and popular motorcycles ever made!

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