• MOTORCYCLIST'S LEGAL HANDBOOK

    Motorcyclists face legal challenges that non-motorcyclists don't even consider. Unfortunately, many motorcyclists are ignorant of those challenges as well … until they find themselves in legal trouble. In addition to all the physical hazards of the road, motorcyclists must negotiate a seemingly endless array of legal hazards, from the myriad licensing requirements and restrictions that vary from state to state to the issue of anti-motorcycle bias among law enforcement officials. While motorcycle magazines frequently publish articles addressing various aspects of the legal issues with which a rider must contend, there has never been a one-stop source that contains all of this information until now. Motorcyclist's Legal Handbook collects all the information a rider needs to know in one comprehensive volume.

    Item: 7308
  • HOW TO BUILD A CAFE RACER

    What's old is new again, and the newest trend on the block is Café Racers.

    Written by well-known motorcycle and automotive author Doug Mitchel, How to Build a Café Racer starts with a history lesson. While those first bikes were built in the UK for racing from café to café, the current rage for Café Racers has definitely spread to the US.

    Converting a stock motorcycle to a Café Racer requires more than a fairing and a few decals. The book starts with chapters on planning and choosing an appropriate bike, followed by chapters that detail the modifications that will likely be embraced by anyone converting a stocker to a rocker. From shocks and tires to engine modifications, Doug's book lays out each type of modification and how it's best carried through.

    The center of the book holds a gallery of finished bikes. These are not just Triumphs or Nortons, but nearly every brand imaginable from Japan, Italy, the UK, and Germany.

    The final chapters include two, start-to-finish Café builds. This is the chance for the reader to see how professional shops take a stock Honda, Triumph, or Ducati and convert it into a fast, sexy, and functional Café Racer, ready to race from cafe to cafe on Saturday night, or around the race track on Sunday afternoon.

    Item: 6684
  • CLASSIC HONDA MOTORCYCLES

    Honda made its mark on the motorcycle world with small, affordable bikes, and grew well beyond that to create some of the most important performance machines ever built. Today, these bikes are increasingly coveted by collectors and enthusiasts. This guide to the collectible Hondas gives prospective buyers a leg up on the current market for groundbreaking classics like the CB77 Super Hawk, CB92 Benly, Dream 300, CB750, CB 400F, as well as 1970 to 1979 models that are quickly becoming classics in their own right. Photographs of the models are accompanied by complete descriptions of specifications, components, paint codes and serial numbers. A five-star rating system rates the bikes on collectability, parts availability, two-up touring compatibility, reliability and power. The author also highlights common repair and restoration needs, and looks ahead at future collectible models. This book is an updated version of the Illustrated Buyer's Guide Classic Honda Motorcycles.

    Item: 6428
  • THE CAFE RACER PHENOMENON

    The café racer is one of the most enduring styles of motorcycle ever created, epitomizing the rebellious spirit of England in the 1950s. The Café Racer Phenomenon is author Alastair Walker's attempt to capture a strand of motorcycle history through the photos, records and memories of the people who were there.

    From its roots in the '59 Club, home-brewed specials and the creation of Triton by Dave Degens, the café racer became the must-have Rockers' motorbike. It then became the template for a new generation of fast road bikes in the 1970s, with the rise of Dunstall, Rickman, Seeley and many more bespoke bike builders. Machines like the Moto Guzzi Le Mans Mk I, Ducati 900SS and the MV Agusta 750S all captured the spirit of the café racer. Then the slick, super fast, Japanese sports bikes of the 1980s came along, setting out to consign the café racer special to the history books.

    However, a revival had to happen. The Ace Café London re-opened, bike builders as diverse as Wakan, Fred Krugger, Nick Gale and Roland Sands began to create lean, back-to-basics motorcycles, but with their own unique twist on the café racer heritage. From the Buell 1125 CR to the Guzzi V7 Sport, mainstream modern bikes have also re-discovered their street racing soul.

    It would be impossible to illustrate the span and influence of 50 years of English motorcycling history in one book, but The Café Racer Phenomenon is meant to provide a taste of this era to inspire a deeper interest within the hardcore classic motorcycling community. Featuring a huge, global café racer directory - listing specialist builders, spares suppliers, Web sites, etc. - alongside a unique mix of personal memoirs, unseen photos, iconic machines and chassis builders in profile, this book takes a look at the enduring cult of the café racer, in all its ton-up glory.

    About the Author: Alastair Walker has been riding motorcycles for more than 30 years and writing about them for two decades. Starting off on a BSA, like his father and grandfather before him, Alastair moved on to owning several Japanese bikes before becoming a freelance motorbike journalist in the late 1980s. Since then he has tested hundreds of bikes, modern and classic, from a humble Honda CG125 to a 5.7-litre, V8-powered, Boss Hoss cruiser.

    Item: 4328

Recently Viewed