Want an MV Agusta? Why Not Make One?

Canadian Jim Bush built his own MV Agusta using Magni bodywork and Triumph forks.
By Robert Smith
January/February 2013
Add to My MSN

Jim Bush built his own frame to house the modern MV F4 engine. Magni bodywork components are still available.
Photo By Robert Smith


Content Tools

Related Content

MV Agusta Collection Heads to Mecum’s Monterey Auction

MV Agusta. It’s a name deeply rooted in motorcycling history, conjuring up visions of epic, fire-eng...

Seventy-one MV Agustas to Sell at Mecum’s Monterey Auction

Wanna buy an MV Agusta? How about 71 at once? Mecum Auctions has lined up what must be the single la...

Scooters invade the National Motorcycle Museum

A new exhibit at the National Motorcycle Museum in Anamosa, Iowa, features a wide range of scooters ...

All-New Vespa 946

After more than 6 years, Vespa USA is introducing an entirely new model. The all-new handcrafted Ves...

That’s what Jim Bush from White Rock, British Columbia, Canada, did — built his own MV Agusta. After transplanting a 910cc engine from an F4 found on eBay into his 750cc Brutale, Jim found the redundant 750cc engine was taking up too much room in his garage. Jim has a bad MV habit, owning a 125cc Café bike and a Chicco scooter as well as the Brutale, and he has a particular passion for the Magni-styled MV street bikes of the 1980s. Magni still sells the bodywork, tank and pipes for these machines, so the next step was obvious.

Bush ordered Magni bodywork components and set to work designing and building his own frame to suit the 750cc engine. The bike wears Triumph forks (machined for period appearance) connected to a four-leading-shoe Grimeca front brake and hub. At the rear, a Ducati drum runs on a swingarm Bush designed and fabricated himself. The gas tank was cut and reworked to accept the F4’s fuel pump, while most of the electrics are also from the F4. There are dozens of Bush’s touches that personalize the bike and make it more practical.

The result is spectacular, a bike that literally turns heads as onlookers try to work out what it is. It looks for all the world like a Magni chain-drive MV until you get closer and spot the modern engine lurking behind the fairing and the digital instrument panel. With at least twice the horsepower of a Seventies 750, it really flies, too. And then there’s the howl from the four Magni pipes, which echoes the magical high-rev rip made by Domenico Agusta’s “fire engine” race bikes of the same era. 

Read more about Agusta in Last of the Breed: MV Agusta 850SS.








Post a comment below.

 








The sound and the fury: celebrate the machines that changed the world!
First Name: *
Last Name: *
Address: *
City: *
State/Province: *
Zip/Postal Code:*
Country:
Email:*
(* indicates a required item)
Canadian subs: 1 year, (includes postage & GST). Foreign subs: 1 year, . U.S. funds.
Canadian Subscribers - Click Here
Non US and Canadian Subscribers - Click Here
 

Motorcycle Classics is America's premier magazine for collectors and enthusiasts, dreamers and restorers, newcomers and life long motorheads who love the sound and the beauty of classic bikes. Every issue  delivers exciting and evocative articles and photographs of the most brilliant, unusual and popular motorcycles ever made!

Save Even More Money with our RALLY-RATE plan!

Pay now with a credit card and take advantage of our RALLY-RATE automatic renewal savings plan. You save an additional $4.95 and get 6 issues of Motorcycle Classics for only $24.95 (USA only).

Or, Bill Me Later and I'll pay just $29.95 for a one year subscription!