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1965 Ducati Mach 1

Don Smith’s neighbor in Appleton, Wisconsin, was a bit of a hoarder. While that might put some people off, not Don.

| July/August 2020

Ducati 

Engine: 248.6cc OHC, four-stroke air-cooled single-cylinder, 74mm x 57.8mm bore and stroke, 10:1 compression ratio, 28hp @ 8,500rpm

Top speed: 105.4mph (170 kmh)

Carburetion: Dell’Orto SS1 29mm



Transmission: 5-speed constant mesh gear primary drive

Electrics: Battery and coil, 6v generator

JohnGregory
6/24/2020 2:57:48 PM

I also have my really sharp 1964 Diana AHRMA Ducati. I have pictures of the Ducs at Daytona and Mid Ohio. Can i attach them?


JohnGregory
6/24/2020 2:56:42 PM

I remember Leon Cromer. I was the WI Berliner Ducati rep and Mike Berliner asked me to go to Laconia to support Leon. My first novice race was Daytona 1968 on a 250 Ducati Scrambler. It Dropped an exhaust valve and Reno Leoni provided a top end. I qualified 5th out of 225 at 126mph 10500rpm. Weighing 200 and a standard ratio gearbox held me back on acceleration, but I finished 12th. Imagine 2 Ducatis in the top 5 Qualifiers against all those Yamaha TD1Bs


LeonCromer
6/22/2020 10:33:47 PM

Good story that brought back many memories and taught me some bits of information that I had never been aware of. I bought a Diana Mk III in October of 1965 as a new model year 1966. Rode it on the street until New Years Eve. As the story relates, that engine had magneto ignition and the kick start was for the most part useless. I removed the lever and got it out of the way. So run-and-bump starting was the norm and provided me with much practice for race starts in AAMRR club racing in '66. I had good success that season and was rewarded with a Monza cam, a matching megaphone, and a fairing (it was a naked bike up until then). The plan was to race in AMA nationals. So, in '67 I took it to Daytona and managed to finish 3rd in the Novice main. I then backed it up with a win at Loudon, NH that June. At V.I.R. in '66 it did 117 mph (calculated) at 9500 rpm with no fairing. At Daytona with the new cam and meg and that all important fairing, it went 133 mph at 10300 rpm. It was a terrific little bike that finished every race those two seasons except two races in Canada when I crashed. Thanks for allowing me to relive a bit of my life.




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